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Our Orland Park Plumber Can Tell You How Your Water Heater Works!

November 5, 2015

At Precision, we have an Orland Park plumber who can perform a wide variety of services on your water heater. When the temperatures outdoor begin to decrease, you’ll want the water temperature in your home to increase. Fortunately, the design of the modern water heater is leaps and bounds ahead of the products on the market just ten years ago, never mind the original concept. This means you’re receiving longer-lasting water heating for plenty of cold seasons ahead.

However, many customers don’t know how exactly a water heater does its job. Precision dedicates itself to not only providing service, but also educating customers about their home’s plumbing. Our Orland Park plumber aims to make sure residents across the area understand the ins and outs of their water heating system.  We’re your service if you want to learn new things about your plumbing!

What Does Our Orland Park Plumber Have to Say?

With all the talk about big storage tanks, you may think water heating is a super complex process. The process of getting hot water to your faucet, shower, or other hot water fixture can be broken down by our Orland Park plumber into three simple steps:

  1. Bringing in the Cold Water – Your water heater is connected to your main water line via a “dip tube.” This element fills the storage tank by balancing pressure. All water heater dip tubes should feature an automatic shut-off valve – this way, if the pressure inside of the tank has failed (i.e. you’ve sprung a leak), the valve closes to avoid wasting water.
  2. Heating the Water – Here’s where tank-types and tankless do it differently. In a conventional tank-type water heater, the water is kept in a 40 to 60 gallon insulated cylinder at a constant temperature ranging between 120 and 180 degrees. Since heat rises, the water at the top of the tank is always the hottest. The water at the bottom is heated by a burner or element, which is controlled by the thermostat. A tankless water heater removes the storage phase entirely. Instead, the cold water is released heated in a series of copper appliance coils. It may take longer for the hot water to get to you, but you do save a great deal of energy by not heating water constantly during the day.
  3. Sending it to the Fixture – The “heat-out pipe,” located at the top of the tank, releases hot water when a faucet is opened, siphoning the water with high pressure. The hot water is pumped out against gravity until it reaches you. Many modern water heaters are able send hot water to plumbing fixtures faster than ever before. That means you’ll get hot water immediately when you need it the most.

Contact Precision today to have an Orland Park plumber install, repair, or replace a water heater in your home so you have hot water for all of your plumbing fixtures!